Contact

I welcome enquiries from anyone interested in this project or my work more broadly. I cannot, however, respond to unsolicited requests for endorsements of any product, organisation or cause. This is beyond the scope of the project as an exercise in scholarly and local historical research.

I can be contacted by email at: canadiansinbexhill@gmail.com and on Twitter @cdnsinbexhill

I can also be contacted by telephone on: +44 (0) 7973 913 128

Advertisements

7 responses to “Contact

  1. Doug Oliver

    Enjoed reading your udates- you seem to have been pretty busy well done and look forward to reading more

  2. ROGER SHARPE

    I’ve been doing some research on Bexhill and the Canadians during WWI and was interested in publishing picture #6, the Canadian Training School views. Could you give me permission or do you know the source I could quote? Nice pictures.

    roger

  3. ROGER SHARPE

    My interest is the Canadian Young Soldiers Battalion. They were stationed there for a short time beginning July 1917. It was a group of young men under 19, and therefore not permitted to cross the channel for active service. They served under Major K.L. Macklin and Lt. Col. D. MacKay. I’m interested in pictures of the camp cooden and Canadian Training School. Do you have any help?

  4. Peggy.

    I found your web-site while looking into my husband’s great-grandfather’s service during WW1. He was Private John Buchanan and was last at the Cooden Convalescent Hospital before he died. There was a note in his military files that he fell from the parade over a railing and was found dead in front of the entrance to the Hastings Gentleman’s Bath House. It said that he died of a skull fracture. His family heard this and the story was passed down that he had been at a “house of ill-repute.” Anyway, I was able to find two articles today in the Hastings and St. Leonard Observer, one in the Jan. 4th, 1919 paper and one in the Jan. 11th, 1919 paper. Basically, he somehow fell over the railing and died. He had been drinking. But the worst part is, he was scheduled to leave the very next morning for home. I don’t think his family knew this, or it may have been forgotten over time.Very sad. It would be great to get to know someone such as yourself to see if there is anything else we could find out about this event, the area, or anything about his time there. We do know that he is buried in Bexhill cemetery. We are planning to visit England and Scotland in late September of this year and would love to explore this area.

    • Thank you for getting in touch. I have the war diaries from this time and will have a look to see if anything was noted. Certainly a previous death was recorded in these. However, as you say, they were close to leaving the town by this point. All Canadian institutions in Bexhill were consolidated to a single location around this time so the war diaries became a bit more sporadic. There were Canadians in Hastings also so he may have been stationed there. All war diaries are held by Library and Archives Canada in Ottawa/Gatineau.

      My work on this has slowed in the last couple of years mainly due to work commitments but I am happy to help in any way I can. You may also want to contact Bexhill Museum and/or Hastings Museum and Art Gallery to see if they can shed any more light on this.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s